american artist

Amy Martino: graphic art & fashion oddity

The fluid-cubist works of Amy Martino have the staying power of a brilliant logo. A Bachelor graduate of Sociology, this freelance art director and graphic designer brings her knowledge of visual branding into surreal digital  fashion illustrations.

Amy Martino fashion illustration for Andrea CrewsAmy Martino fashion illustration for Andrea Crews

Painting limericks: Duy Huynh

For Duy Huynh (pronounced Yee Wun) drawing was his way of settling in a strange world as a youngster immigrant. Years passed and the Vietnamese-born artist kept his childhood passion as a means of living after graduating from UNC Charlotte, North Carolina with a degree in painting and illustration.

Duy Huynh, Flightless Birds Of A FeatherDuy Huynh, Flightless Birds Of A Feather

Dadu Shin - illustrating with a point

A young American artist with an ice-cream company name (in his own words) Dadu Shin does highly original illustration with strong concepts. Some of them are images of written ideas, collaborating with financial issue PLANSPONSOR being one of the proudest moments for the artist. A fresh graduate from Rhode Island Institute of Design, Dadu Shin experiments with various techniques and trains his drawing skills with fashion illustration. For his commissioned works he uses or mixes painting with digital rendering tehnology, admittedly for the beauty of firm lines and shapes.

Dadu Shin, Re-cultureDadu Shin, Re-culture

Heather Mattoon's fashionable cats

"We should be more like cats: soulful, stylish, and entirely unconcerned with others’ opinions" says artist Heather Mattoon, motivating her lovely Cats in Clothes series of paintings. Each portrait shows a unique character, each cat having a distinct personality and an outfit to match. Also every art piece comes with a brief description, a teaser to a fun possible story.

Savannah by Heather Mattoon, Cats in ClothesSavannah by Heather Mattoon, Cats in Clothes

Melancholic vision of desire

Audrey Kawasaki’s artworks are based on splendid contradictions. Her painted heroines and heroes are erotic and innocent, young but wise, disturbingly beautiful, intentionally ambiguous. Audrey’s style is influenced by both Manga comics and Art Nouveau, her ideas being brought to life with unique, flawless painting techniques.

Audrey Kawasaki, My Dishonest HeartAudrey Kawasaki, My Dishonest Heart

Spring solo shows at London Miles

If you happen to be in London at the second half of March you must make a stop at the London Miles contemporary art gallery. UK's top venue for surrealist, pop, lowbrow, comic book and illustration art will put on show the works of two amazing American artists Stella Im Hultberg and Scott Belcastro.

"Fragmented is the highly anticipated solo show from Stella Im Hultberg. Her paintings are conceived in varying combinations of ink, watercolor, and oils on paper, wood and canvas. Her portraits of women are rendered in easy, flowing lines with soft hues that transcend the typical critiques of feminine beauty, inherent in today's self conscious society."

Fragmented, by Stella Im HultbergFragmented, by Stella Im Hultberg

Artist submission: Ash Lethal

Ashleigh Fedo from Ash Lethal likes our modern art blog and we couldn’t be more honored to feature the works of this young American artist. Born in sunny Palm Beach, Florida, Ashleigh is a self-taught illustrator with a keen interest in music and a big love for animals (she is a SPCA volunteer). She began her artist career in April 2007 and since then she added in her portfolio notable group and solo art shows around Atlanta and at the Hive Gallery in L.A. as well as great artwork for music album covers, band t-shirts prints, advertising logos and other design projects.

Ash Lethal, The DaliaAsh Lethal, The Dalia

Forceful feminine visions

I am very fond of surrealistic art, as a form of expressing pure, genuine emotions. That is probably why these otherworldly girls, painted by Lori Earley, gained my full interest. Born and raised in New York, Lori studied at School of Visual Arts from NY City and from 2004 began exhibiting her works all over USA and in Europe.

Lori Earley, Ms VLori Earley, Ms V

Fragile girls in ink

Ashley Goldberg's characters seem very fragile, looking for true friendship and protection. She draws shy little girls, with plush bears in their arms, hiding in trees and in most cases being accompanied by cute kittens or elves.

Ashley Goldberg, Why So BlueAshley Goldberg, Why So Blue

Dienzo's cute & creepy adolescents

I find Rick "Dienzo" Blanco's characters are delightfully charming. Creepy & Cute is what defines Dienzo's style in fine art, this American artist being inspired in creating his acrylic characters by his work for Disney, Mattel and Cartoon Network. His dark and odd young things are meant to intrigue and cause anxiety, also suggesting that we all have a darker side coming to the surface when we are expecting the least.

Dienzo, Bella RegrettingDienzo, Bella Regretting

Wayne Levin and his monochromatic oceans

Underwater world photographed in black and white? You could think that such an approach minimizes the beauty of seascapes and marine animals. But in fact, Wayne Levin photographs enhance their uniqueness, and give a more fictional look to the underwater world.

Wayne Levin, FloatingWayne Levin, Floating

Sylvia Ji and her sad fairies

Sylvia Ji constantly surprises us with her beautiful paintings. Focusing especially on feminine figures (perhaps her own alter-egos), Sylvia explores beauty, sensuality, social notions in provocative captivating artworks. Some of her heroines are, as I said before, symbolic reflections of her, others are fictional figures, juxtaposed with mystical landscapes, all bursting into passion and decay.

Sylvia Ji, Worm WoodSylvia Ji, Worm Wood

Among dreams and monster tales

Dan May's gentle, furry monsters have always maintained a level of humanity. And, surprisingly or not, May's recent collection, called "Into the wild" expands this humanity into a deeper emotional level. Living in Jacksonville, FL, Dan May has exhibited his haunting surreal visions in galleries throughout the US and abroad.

Dan May, Curious Dreamers Wander Thy SolitudeDan May, Curious Dreamers Wander Thy Solitude

Feminine icons and mythical symbolism

Kris Lewis grew up in a family that gathered seven brothers and one sister, and, although his father provided the artistic genes, it was his mother who actually influenced his work as a painter. She taught him about the importance of working hard, as he watched her raise an entirely family, after his parents' separation.

She encouraged him to cherish her Latvian heritage and that is until today a major influence in his work. Her mother's struggle has had a great meaning for him, and is probably the reason why women are a constant theme in his paintings. Both strength and fragility of them inspire and influence him in his quest of being a better human being.

Kris Lewis, Baltic SeaKris Lewis, Baltic Sea

Snapshots of everlasting nature

For her Human Nature art project Debbie Carlos took stunning nature-like photography with wild-life scene exhibits at Chicago's Field Museum. Debbie's photographs of taxidermied animals give the illusion that a quiet life goes on inside those glass showcases. It's because of the obscure light she explores in her photos, those desaturated tones that makes the images romantic but dark, with a mystical atmosphere.

Debbie Carlos, Human NatureDebbie Carlos, Human Nature

Caia Koopman's beautiful universe

She wanted to graduate in math but reconsidered and became fine arts major instead. And that was a really wise decision as Caia Koopman is nowadays one of the most appreciated young American artists. Born in Livermore, USA, Caia earned a BA at UC Santa Cruz, a place that also lured her to the local skateboarding scene.

Caia Koopman, The White RabbitCaia Koopman, The White Rabbit

Passionate about painting and life itself

Melissa Moss has a very interesting tale. In the past she worked in publishing, but a full-time job in that field didn't exactly trill her. Every day she felt more depressed for having to go over and over again to that job she didn't feel comfortable with. So one day she followed her husband's advice and quitted that job. And guess what? Afterwards, she founded her true passion in painting!

Melissa Moss, Too HappyMelissa Moss, Too Happy

True passion for fairytales

Michelle "Mia" Araujo is only 24 years old and has already astonished critics with her acrylic on wood paintings. Born in Los Angeles, Mia graduated Otis College of Art & Design and her works are being submitted in well-known art shows and galleries including Roq la Rue, Ad Hoc Art or Corey Helford Gallery. She also has a twin sister which is both her harshest critic and closest friend.

Mia Araujo, PersephoneMia Araujo, Persephone

Exploring mind's fears and obsessions

 Jonathan Viner's "Harem" collection explores themes of intimacy and vulnerability, control and voyeurism with its captivating, realistic representations of sensual girls listening to headphones; which, reminding me of John Fowles' s novel The Collector, are altered from independent individuals to vivid artifacts.

Jonathan Viner, IrinaJonathan Viner, Irina

The magical world of sheepies and misos

If you're wondering what is Miso's art all about, I will tell you that her imagination is fascinated and stirred by ecocatastrophe, biology and evolution. Her strange creatures, subjects of her paintings, graphite artworks, ink drawings and sculptures, may be considered part of a new species, living here on Earth after an imminent catastrophe.

Miso, Teardrop 2Miso, Teardrop 2

Fashion cards and gothic queens

Californian (LA) designer and illustrator Connie Lim places glamorous, dark yet playful girls on playing cards, proving that fashion creativity really has no limits. At the present she is a student of renowned Central Saint Martins and much in love with the city of London.

Connie Lim, Fashion Playing CardsConnie Lim, Fashion Playing Cards

Can morbid be cute?

I would never have thought that creepy and cute could go together in a sentence. That was until I saw Kristen Tercek's incredible acrylic on wood paintings signed Cuddly Rigor Mortis. Jersey based artist, trained at NYU Film School lives in the woods with beloved husband and two chihuahuas, painting small pictures of "thoughts had in the dead of night".

Cuddly Rigor Mortis, MulliganCuddly Rigor Mortis, Mulligan

Sisters, farms and supernatural forces

Rural scenes, sad brides, strange sisters, crows, fire, superstitions and supernatural forces. These are what Andrea Kowch captures in her beautiful, mysterious paintings, shown all over in the United States and Canada.

Andrea Kowch, No Turning BackAndrea Kowch, No Turning Back

The new face of reality

Gage Opdenbrouw aims at painting "the exterior world in such a way as to evoke the mysterious richness & vastness of the interior world each of us carries within". Working especially with oil paints, this talented artist gets his inspiration from real life, but after studying and sketching his subjects he focuses on something not entirely visible. Because nothing seems to be what you thought, the second time you give it a glimpse.

Gage Opdenbrouw, Dead Couple, Dia de Los MuertosGage Opdenbrouw, Dead Couple, Dia de Los Muertos

Focus on Uncertain Times

Amy Casey's paintings recreate, with acrylic on panel, on canvas or on paper, her nightmares concerning the end of the world. "Inspired by natural and unnatural disasters, personal fiascos and never-ending stream of bad news coming from the media, the world inside my paintings has been turned (sometimes literally) upside down. The ground has crumbled underneath them and the sky is falling", says Amy.

Amy Casey, Keeping it TogetherAmy Casey, Keeping it Together, 2009

Paintings, traveling and a seek for inspiration

I simply love the world that Seth Armstrong depicts through his paintings. He mixes realism with a touch of fictional; he knows how to be ironic without crossing the line, and funny without diminishing the message of his artworks. Plus, if the subject of his works is violence or sensuality, he delivers a powerful message, in a subtle way, without underestimating the viewer’s intelligence.

Seth Armstrong, A view of Budapest from the trekkie deekieSeth Armstrong, A view of Budapest from the trekkie deekie

Magic world, magic paintings

Kelly Vivanco admits she enjoys painting without planning, just letting her imagination run free and see where it takes her. To people who ask what are her artworks about she encourages them to find their own meanings. The artist depicts a late childhood’s fantasy world where animal talk (and wear hats) and young girls are the heroines of great adventures which imply magic wildlife, treasures, fairies, epic tests and a secret reward.

Kelly Vivanco, Offshore

Kelly Vivanco, Offshore

Benjamin Anderson's artistic "soup"

Benjamin Anderson's biggest passions are portraits. That's because this type of art work provokes him to find a representation that reflects the many different characteristics of an individual.

Benjamin Anderson self-portraitBenjamin Anderson, self-portrait

Art among skeletons

Joe Vollan's art seems inspired by nightmares, fears, menaces, by nature and its cruel rules. And most of all, Joe Vollan's paintings are without exception author's mind processes. Through his surrealistic pieces of art, painted in their majority with acrylic on panel and acrylic on canvas, he creates bizarre worlds. He creates fantastic tales, where skeletons, giant whales, humanized birds and other terrifying creatures live their adventures like people in the real world do; they die, they suffer and most of all, they are willing to escape their own monsters.Joe Vollan Painting

 

The imaginarium of Maggie Taylor

Surreal ambiguity, haunting faces, otherworldly hybrid characters, and the mix of familiar with the menace; an unsettling mood and an irreproachable painterly technique describe the fascinating digital art of Maggie Taylor.

The Florida based artist began her career as a still-life photographer after studying philosophy at Yale and photography at the University of Florida. In 1996 she started to use computer techniques to create her imaginary worlds and fell in love with the result. Maggie says she is forever bound to her parallel universe: “Making images for me is a way of life. I can't imagine not doing it. I guess in terms of what motivates me, the best answer would be, if I don't make images I'm unhappy."

Maggie Taylor: The Experience, 2009