surrealism

Andrea Wan's reflexive illustrations

Born in Hong Kong, raised in Vancouver, relocated to Berlin, Andrea Wan discovered her talent for illustration when making an animated short for her Film graduation project at Emily Carr University. The animation was based on some of her sketches and her friends persuaded Andrea to carry on this artistic path.

Dream On Little Ghosts, illustration by Andrea WanDream On Little Ghosts, illustration by Andrea Wan

Fashion photography and vintage cameras

These mesmerizing images belong to brilliant Ellen Rogers, specialized in fine art and fashion photography. For this magnificent work she uses about 30-40 different cameras, depending on her mood.

Ellen Rogers, CrowEllen Rogers, Crow

Cars, vivid colors and ghosts

What I love most about Andreas M. Wiese's paintings is that each of them has a captivating scenario at its core. Whether is about old cars, lost cities, troubling, ghostly characters, each artwork opens a strange and unique world to the observer where all things are at the line between magic realism and surreal.

Andreas M. Wiese, The Emperor of Iona  (Der Herrscher von Iona)Andreas M. Wiese, The Emperor of Iona (Der Herrscher von Iona)

Astonishing mind games

Nothing is what it seems at first sight. If you look closely enough you will see reality distorted in a beautiful, stunning way. Vladimir Kush's paintings and sculptures fascinate me. This talented Russian artist plays with our perceptions and makes startling connections I would never think possible.

Vladimir Kush, Breakfast on The LakeVladimir Kush, Breakfast on The Lake

From photography to illustration

Darren Hopes was always an illustrator. He had no doubt about what career he should choose, but, despite his feelings, he ended up studying photography. "Jem Southam came along and (...) showed me cut up photographs, constructed images, scribbled on negatives, painted on Polaroid, photo-illustration (...) and I was tempted".

Darren Hopes, digital illustrationDarren Hopes, digital illustration

Focus on Uncertain Times

Amy Casey's paintings recreate, with acrylic on panel, on canvas or on paper, her nightmares concerning the end of the world. "Inspired by natural and unnatural disasters, personal fiascos and never-ending stream of bad news coming from the media, the world inside my paintings has been turned (sometimes literally) upside down. The ground has crumbled underneath them and the sky is falling", says Amy.

Amy Casey, Keeping it TogetherAmy Casey, Keeping it Together, 2009

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